International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 2, No. 1

Book review: Class, Tax, & Power: Municipal Budgeting in the United States
Book review: Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government
Book review: Regulatory Realities: The Implementation and Impact of Industrial Environmental Regulation
Book review: The Management and Reform of Japanese Government, 2nd edition
Erratum
Inefficiency in Public Organizations
Learning from the Pioneers: Modernizing Local Government. Part One
Once More into Surplus: Reforming Expenditure Management in Australia and Canada
Reinventing  Government: The Israeli Exception
The Interface Management Frontier: Modernizing Local Government. Part Three.
The New Public Mangement and it's Critics
The Strategic Management Challenge: Modernizing Local Government. Part Two

Documents

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Ascendant ]

The Strategic Management Challenge: Modernizing Local Government. Part Two The Strategic Management Challenge: Modernizing Local Government. Part Two

Filesize: 878.67 kB

Frieder Naschold, Glenn Daley

As local government undergoes internal moderniza­tion, it faces the challenge of strategic management. This challenge includes the need to coordinate the newly decentralized elements of government; the need for organizational development and cultural change, so that values and behavior within the organization keep pace with structural developments; and the need to manage uncertainty, as local governments face an increasingly competitive and rapidly chang­ing environment. Empirical studies show that strategic management capabilities have not developed evenly across a broad international sample of reform cities. However, the successful program in Christchurch, New Zealand, offers suggestions for other cities.

The New Public Mangement and it's Critics The New Public Mangement and it's Critics

Filesize: 1.25 MB

David G. Mathiasen

It is possible to view the New Public Management as nothing more than the public management equivalent of a cake recipe, a set of practices that can be readily transferred from one culture and one political system to another. If such is the case, then discussions of principles and paradigms are academic; it is necessary only to identify best practices. It will then be up to politicians to realize that they have only to open the book, follow the instructions, and reap the rewards. However, even within the OECD countries such a possibility is not plausible. Within Europe, there are substantial differences in the political and cultural traditions of OECD countries. And diversity within the OECD goes beyond to include Mexico, Japan and Korea but also the former communist countries of Hungary, the Czech Republic and Poland. Since the applicability and effectiveness of New Public Management concepts will vary considerably from one country to another, we are left with a considerable challenge: How might we apply these concepts to new settings?

The Interface Management Frontier: Modernizing Local Government. Part Three. The Interface Management Frontier: Modernizing Local Government. Part Three.

Filesize: 1.23 MB

Frieder Naschold, Glenn Daley

At the beginning of the 21st Century, local government faces the major challenge of restructuring and managing a new interface with its social, economic, and political environment. The devolution of public tasks to society requires a redefinition of the role of local govern­ment. The shift from producing to guaranteeing the remaining services requires at least the adoption of best practices from private-sector strategic marketing, production, and purchasing management. The restructuring of local government for customer satisfaction and decentralized deci­sion-making requires careful attention to the demands of democratic political control, as well as to legitimate public interests that may not be included in the customer-satisfaction model. Thus, public management of local government cannot be content with internal modernization, but must redefine its relationships with its environment.

Reinventing  Government: The Israeli Exception Reinventing Government: The Israeli Exception

Filesize: 843.17 kB

Iris Geva-May

In recent years, the institutionalization of norms of policy accountability and planning in the Israeli public administration has preoccupied a series of committees on public service reform and government reorganization. This paper discusses the background of the Israeli policy-making culture and its effect on recommendations for systematic policy planning, analysis, evaluation, and accountability. This account is interesting, partly, because it traces a reaction to institutional arrangements that are in many ways similar to those promoted by advocates of the New Public Management. Ironically, however, it explains the efforts to replace them with something more like traditional bureaucratic arrangements.

Once More into Surplus: Reforming Expenditure Management in Australia and Canada Once More into Surplus: Reforming Expenditure Management in Australia and Canada

Filesize: 1.21 MB

Joanne Kelly, John Wanna

Canadian and Australian federal government budgets have returned to surplus. Over the past two decades both countries have undertaken financial management and budgetary reforms in an effort to control expenditure growth and public debt. They exchanged ideas, borrowed techniques, and shared reform experiences. Yet during the mid-1980s and early 1990s they displayed markedly different levels of success in expenditure control. This article explains why relatively similar instruments of expenditure control and financial management produced different outcomes in Australia and Canada. The analysis suggests that budgetary techniques will have marginal impact unless they are congruent with broader policy management systems and administrative cultures. The comparative analysis provides important lessons for budget reformers in all jurisdictions.

Learning from the Pioneers: Modernizing Local Government. Part One Learning from the Pioneers: Modernizing Local Government. Part One

Filesize: 1.36 MB

Frieder Naschold, Glenn Daley

At the end of the century, we are in a position to look back over a decade of restructuring local governments. Our evaluation of the reform movement underway throughout the world indicates a "dialectic of modernization": considerable progress in some areas, stagnation or erosion in others, and challenges that demand attention. Based on comparative case studies of local governments, this article identifies and discusses several major trends-positive and negative-observed in the experience of reform governments in various countries. It also identifies conditions for lasting success of local government reform. Two companion articles set out the central challenges that now face local governments: making the transition to strategic management, and redefining the interfaces between local administration and its political, social, and economic environment.

Inefficiency in Public Organizations Inefficiency in Public Organizations

Filesize: 1.38 MB

Aidan R. Vining, David L. Weimer

Theories of market and government failure provide resources for diagnosing infra-organizational inefficiency in public organizations and for identifying possible solutions. Public goods, externalities, information asymmetries, monopolies, uncertainty, inap­propriate reward systems, and interest group behavior create inefficien­cies within organizations just as they do in the larger economy. Associated with many of these problems are generic solutions that can usefully inform leaders in their efforts to improve efficiency within their public organizations.

Book review: The Management and Reform of Japanese Government, 2nd edition (Institute of Administrat Book review: The Management and Reform of Japanese Government, 2nd edition (Institute of Administrat

Filesize: 895.87 kB

Steven M. Maser

The Management and Reform of Japanese Government (MRJG), 2nd Edition, edited by Masujima and O'uchi (Institute of Administrative Management, 1995), and Public Sector Transformation (PST), by Freider Naschold and Casten von Otter (John Benjamins Publishing Company, 1996), focus on Japan, Germany, and Sweden. The book on Japan, written by people who have traveled in administrative circles as players, students of the subject, or a combination of the two, is a treasure trove of details about administrative reform. ..

Book review: Regulatory Realities: The Implementation and Impact of Industrial Environmental Regulat Book review: Regulatory Realities: The Implementation and Impact of Industrial Environmental Regulat

Filesize: 360.86 kB

Shelley H. Metzenbaum

Over the past quarter century, the economies of many developed countries have grown dramatically at the same time that their environmental regulatory structures have become increasingly elaborate and protective. Yet despite this evidence that economic development and environmental protection can rise together, the two policy objectives are widely perceived as mutually antagonistic....

<< Start < Prev 1 2 Next > End >>
Page 1 of 2