International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 4, No. 2

Book review: Missing Organizational Linkage: Tools for Cross-Level Research
Getting Agencies to Work Together: The Practice and Theory of Managerial Craftsmanship
Public management of hybrid organizations: governance of quasi-autonomous executive agencies
Reply: letter to the editor
Star wars: voyaging into the unknown
The management reform agenda, 2001–2010: a report to the PriceWaterhouseCoopers endowment for the business of government
The new public management: context and practice in Africa

Documents

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The new public management: context and practice in The new public management: context and practice in

Filesize: 95.68 kB

Kempe Ronald Hope, Sr.

Many governments have embraced the NPM as the framework or paradigm through which governments are modernized and the public sector re-engineered. Indeed, the NPM offers important lessons and analyses for public management throughout the world and African countries are no exception to the process of implementation of efforts aimed at achieving the outcomes embodied in the said NPM. This article explores the relationship between the basic context of the NPM, as applied in practice to public sector reform in Africa, and discusses the impact stemming therefrom.

The management reform agenda, 2001–2010: a report to the PriceWaterhouseCoopers endowment for the bu The management reform agenda, 2001–2010: a report to the PriceWaterhouseCoopers endowment for the bu

Filesize: 640.24 kB

James R. Thompson, Fred Thompson

This study reports the answers given by leading scholars of public administration in the United
States to the following questions:

- Will restructuring of public services persist? Will this mean further use of market-like mech- anisms? Greater organizational and spatial decentralization?

- Will public services continue to follow the lead of business in formulating their purposes, measuring efforts and accomplishments, and conducting operations, especially the emphasis on service quality and customer satisfaction?

- Will the NPM reform agenda of the last decade be a transient phenomenon? Or, will it come to be regarded as something ended in the late 1990s?

The expert panel was also asked to assess the degree to which the public sector reforms promoted by Al Gore’s National Performance Review were embraced by the federal government and to forecast future trends. Finally, the panel was asked to evaluate the individual components of Gore’s NPM reform agenda.

Star wars: voyaging into the unknown Star wars: voyaging into the unknown

Filesize: 52.84 kB

Robert I. McLaren

The mainstream literature with respect to international organizations (IOs) generally concludes that the field suffers from the lack of significant scholarship addressed to the operations, management, and decision making within IOs. I contend that there is a great deal of scholarly work in the literature if one looks in the right places. I suggest that the seeming lack of scholarly literature is a result of misperception on the part of mainstream scholars as to where this literature can be found.

Public management of hybrid organizations: governance of quasi-autonomous executive agencies Public management of hybrid organizations: governance of quasi-autonomous executive agencies

Filesize: 94.9 kB

Walter J. M. Kickert

This article presents the results of case analyses of eleven executive agencies from four Dutch ministerial departments: Education and Sciences; Agriculture, Nature and Fisheries; Transport and Public Works; and, Justice. These agencies are all so-called hybrid organizations; that is, they are somewhere between pure government agencies on one hand and commercial firms on the other. Such organizations make up the bulk of the public sphere in many Western European countries. Public management theorists must understand and explain the governance of this increasingly important class of hybrid organizations.

Getting Agencies to Work Together: The Practice and Theory of Managerial Craftsmanship (Eugene Barda Getting Agencies to Work Together: The Practice and Theory of Managerial Craftsmanship (Eugene Barda

Filesize: 32.68 kB

Joan Subirats, Raquel Gallego

The theme of this book is interagency collaboration in the public sector, and the author succeeds in revealing its interest both to public management researchers and to practitioners. Eugene Bardach defines interagency collaboration as the creation of joint production capa­bilities in the delivery of services and in regulatory enforcement. He sees interagency collaboration capacity (ICC)—namely, the potential to engage in collaborative activities—as a necessary basis for innovation and for the creation of public value.1 The public sector needs to innovate in both its products and its processes, so as to be effective and efficient in an ever more complex social and economic context. However, both theorists and practitioners agree that, despite being increasingly necessary, ICC is still a rara avis. The existing literature on public management in general, and on best practice research in particular, has reported a wealth of experiences and cases in which collaboration was a management tool, but has shown how difficult it was to use it effectively.

Book review: Missing Organizational Linkage: Tools for Cross-Level Research (Paul Goodman;   Thousan Book review: Missing Organizational Linkage: Tools for Cross-Level Research (Paul Goodman; Thousan

Filesize: 16.61 kB

Martha S. Feldman

In his new book, Missing Organizational Linkage: Tools for Cross-Level Research, Paul Goodman introduces organizational linkage analysis. The book asks an important question—how can we understand the effects that actions at one level of an organization have on other (often higher) levels of the organization—and proposes a set of tools for answering the question. Organizational linkage adopts ideas from a range of sources, including systems thinking, to create a set of tools that enable the researcher to analyze the effects of action at one level of an organization on other levels of the organization. Goodman shows how the analysis can help us understand the effects of organizational errors, organizational change, and organizational learning.