International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 5, No. 1

A comparative analysis of the development of performance-based management systems in Dutch and Norwegian local government
Is innovation a question of will or opportunity? The case of three governments
Research methodology for New Public Management
The influence of neomanagerialsm on reform of the Chilean civil service

Documents

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The influence of neomanagerialsm on reform of the Chilean civil service The influence of neomanagerialsm on reform of the Chilean civil service

Filesize: 1.38 MB

Rodrigo Mardones

This paper assesses the influence of the New Public Management paradigm on the reform process of the Chilean civil service. I follow Peter Hall's three approaches to study the role of public ideas in economic policymaking. I add a fourth: the idea-centered approach, which seeks to explain neomanagerialism on its own merits as a cohesive and significant public idea. The state-centered approach shows the constraints that civil service institutions pose for the proposals of reform: the high number of political appointments is the most important obstacle remaining for the development of a career civil service. The economist-centered approach clarifies the influence of Chilean technocrats in framing the paradigm within the country's context. Lastly, the coalition-centered approach explains the politics of reform. I show that labor-management cooperation was essential for the advancement of a performance-based compensation system, which is a key neomanagerial feature. The study concludes that, while maintaining the fundamental tenets of neomanagerialism, the final national result confirms the existence of divergent reform strategies.

Research methodology for New Public Management Research methodology for New Public Management

Filesize: 3.06 MB

Nancy C. Roberts, Raymond Trevor Bradley

This article outlines recommendations for improving research methodology in New Public Management (NPM). It begins by describing three characteristics related to NPM that make it such a research challenge: a change in perspective, a willingness to experiment, and the high-stakes conse­quences of NPM research and its results. Recommendations for improvements are grouped within the five stages of the research process: formulating the research question and specifying the units and levels of analysis; choosing the research design; sampling and gathering the data, coding and analyzing the data; and interpreting the results. Two ongoing large-scale programs of research (one on innovation and the other on the dynamics of social organization) illustrate how the recommendations can be put into practice. Taken as a whole, the recommendations call for a systems approach to NPM research that is supported by teams of interdisciplinary researchers who complement one another's knowledge and skills and collaborate on long-term, field-based studies.

Is innovation a question of will or opportunity? The case of three governments Is innovation a question of will or opportunity? The case of three governments

Filesize: 1.64 MB

Eleanor D. Glor

This paper contrasts two approaches to understanding innovation: voluntary, which is based on will, and determined, which is based on factors, usually outside the immediate control of those in government. The two methods are applied to examples of innovation in three Canadian governments, the Region of York, the Government of Saskatchewan, and the Government of Canada. Both voluntary and determined approaches were found to reveal and to hide certain aspects of innovation. Each approach is found to have merit and to teach lessons. Whether one is a better approach to understanding the innovation process is assessed.

A comparative analysis of the development of performance-based management systems in Dutch and Norwe A comparative analysis of the development of performance-based management systems in Dutch and Norwe

Filesize: 1.72 MB

G . Jan van Helden, Åge Johnsen

The purpose of this paper is to compare performance management in Dutch and Norwegian municipalities. The analysis of performance budgets and annual reports from nine municipalities from each country shows that performance management changed during the 1990s. Contingent factors such as fiscal stress, opportunity for change, organizational size (uncertainty), and characteristics of the policy fields (ambiguity) were analyzed to explain this pattern. The results indicated two important implications for public management and for contingency theory: the Nordic, incremental and con­sensual model may give substantial opportunity for change; and the conventional wisdom in organi­zational control requires further development regarding political control.