International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 6, No. 2

ASSESSING INTERNATIONAL FISCAL AND MONETARY TRANSPARENCY: THE ROLE OF STANDARDS, KNOWLEDGE
     MANAGEMENT AND PROJECT DESIGN
BOOK REVIEW: GOVERNANCE IN A GLOBALIZING WORLD BY JOSEPH D. NYE AND JOHN D. DONAHUE, EDS.
BOOK REVIEW: HOLDING THE STATE TO ACCOUNT: CITIZEN MONITORING IN ACTION BY SAMUEL PAUL
IPMN SYMPOSIUM ON PERFORMANCE BUDGETING AND THE POLITICS OF REFORM
Perceived reputation and alliance building in the public and private sectors
RISK, REFORM AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: THE CASE OF IRS TAX SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION
THE DEVELOPMENT OF CONTRACTING IN THE CONTEXT OF INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT IN THE UK: THE CASE OF THE
     PRIVATE FINANCE INITIATIVE IN THE NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE
TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIAN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES: CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL
     IMPLEMENTATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

Documents

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TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIAN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES: CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIAN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES: CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION

Filesize: 256.61 kB

TEDDY LIAN KOK FEI, HAL G. RAINEY

A major total quality management initiative by the Malaysian government provided the opportunity to survey over 400 managers in twelve of the twenty-four government agencies about the implementation and impact of TQM, and to compare agencies that have won quality awards to those that have not. Managers from award- winning agencies gave higher ratings of their agency’s implementation of TQM, their agency head’s emphasis on quality-related objectives, and on leadership behaviors such as clear vision, trust, communication, involvement, and encouragement. They also reported higher levels of emphasis on communication and innovation in their organization’s culture. Regression analysis further shows that the managers’ perceptions of effective implementation of TQM are related to these leadership behaviors and cultural conditions. The results support many of the prescriptions of TQM proponents and change management experts about conditions for successful change, and indicate that they have applicability across nations and cultures, and to the public sector. The conceptual framework for the study and the survey scales should be of interest to researchers on TQM and organizational change.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF CONTRACTING IN THE CONTEXT OF INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT IN THE UK: THE CASE OF TH THE DEVELOPMENT OF CONTRACTING IN THE CONTEXT OF INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT IN THE UK: THE CASE OF TH

Filesize: 244.06 kB

JANE BROADBENT, JAS GILL, RICHARD LAUGHLIN

Ongoing change in the management of public services has led to development of many initiatives in the control of day-to-day resources as New Public Management1 (Hood 1991, 1995) continues its reforms. In this context debates about control of capital expenditure have taken a less-visible role despite some earlier and influential comment on the area (Perrin 1978, for example). Perhaps as the flow of ideas for reform in the management of day-to-day activities has waned, attention has turned more systematically to the efficient use of capital resources or infrastructure. This has been accompanied by recognition of the poor state of some public sector infrastructure. This paper is concerned with the implications of the changing approaches to the provision of infrastructure in the UK National Health Service (NHS). Its particular focus is the Private Finance Initiative (PFI) and the contractual implications this brings into infrastructure development.

RISK, REFORM AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: THE CASE OF IRS TAX SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION RISK, REFORM AND ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE: THE CASE OF IRS TAX SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION

Filesize: 259.87 kB

BARRY BOZEMAN

The public management reform literature admonishes public managers to take risks. As is so often the case with prescriptions for public management reform, there is much more advice about risk-taking, its merits and demerits, than there is research on the incidence, causes, and effects of public management risk-taking. In an attempt to understand the role of risk culture in public management reform, the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) experience implementing the largest information technology (IT) reform ever undertaken by a U.S. civilian agency is examined. IRS work in IT reform has been ongoing at least since 1989, but we focus specifically on the period 1990-1996 under the phase known as Tax Systems Modernization (TSM). This period is especially interesting inasmuch as it involved one of the greatest investments in federal agency IT ever undertaken, because it was generally viewed as a signal failure, and because one of the chief factors in this failed reform was the agency's risk culture.

Perceived reputation and alliance building in the public and private sectors Perceived reputation and alliance building in the public and private sectors

Filesize: 196.98 kB

Susanne Royer, Roland H. Simons, Robert W. Waldersee

This study investigated the relationship between the self/partner cooperation reputation, the starting condition of a cooperation, payoff structure, and the willingness to cooperate of alliance partners in the context of real business settings. An experimental study was conducted with 816 private-sector professionals and a comparison group of 169 public-sector managers. It was hypothesized that cooperation reputation would reduce the impact of payoff structure. Results indicated that perceived reputation of the alliance partner had a significant impact on participants' willingness to cooperate. These results challenge the perceived importance of payoff structure and further support Parkhe’s (1993a) suggestions that perceived reputation is an important aspect of alliances, seldom included in empirical studies. It was also demonstrated that, for both public and private sectors, maintaining a good cooperation image as well as maintaining effective relations throughout the alliance were associated with participant willingness to cooperate. Implications for both sectors are discussed.

IPMN SYMPOSIUM ON PERFORMANCE BUDGETING AND THE POLITICS OF REFORM IPMN SYMPOSIUM ON PERFORMANCE BUDGETING AND THE POLITICS OF REFORM

Filesize: 188.87 kB

L. R. JONES

Various systems to integrate performance measurement into budgeting are applied in nations around the world. Governments at all levels in a number of nations have embarked on a journey into an era of performance measurement and management. Performance budgeting, or application of performance analysis in budgeting, is a topic of considerable discourse in the public management community. This symposium provides dialogue and comment on efforts to integrate performance evaluation into the executive budget process at the federal government level in the United States of America under the administration of President George W. Bush.

ASSESSING INTERNATIONAL FISCAL AND MONETARY TRANSPARENCY: THE ROLE OF STANDARDS, KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMEN ASSESSING INTERNATIONAL FISCAL AND MONETARY TRANSPARENCY: THE ROLE OF STANDARDS, KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMEN

Filesize: 315.71 kB

BRYANE MICHAEL, MICHAEL BATES

The IMF has been leading efforts to develop and implement codes of monetary and fiscal transparency. Such codes aim to increase disclosure of public-sector information on the Internet representing a type of "e-transparency." Do such codes and increased Internet-based, public-sector information achieve their objectives? Much e-government theory sees electronic presence and e-transparency as a first step toward transformationary e-government. Yet, e-transparency itself represents a transformation in e-government. This article will first describe the results of a private-sector based assessment of fiscal and monetary transparency and report cross-country ratings. Second, it will describe a new method of assessment which emphasizes the role of knowledge management and the critical role played by assessment project design. Lastly, this article will discuss the extent to which such e-government efforts aimed at greater transparency achieve broader objectives such as increased trust, predictability, credibility, oversight, and political accountability in the public sector. The lessons in this article are applicable to governments engaged in promoting and assessing transparency as well as corporations.