International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 6, No. 3

Introduction: the process dynamics of public management policymaking
Public management policy change in Brazil: 1995-1998
Public management policy change in Mexico, 1982-2000
Public management policy change in the United States during the Clinton era
Public management policymaking in Spain, 1982-1996: Policy entrepreneurship and (in)opportunity windows
Reform, routines and capacity building: Civil service policy change in Thailand 1991-1992

Documents

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Reform, routines and capacity building: Civil service policy change in Thailand 1991-1992 Reform, routines and capacity building: Civil service policy change in Thailand 1991-1992

Filesize: 280.97 kB

Surapong Malee

This article explores the process of public management policy 1 change in Thailand between 1991 and 1992.2 It deals primarily with civil service policy¯conceived as a subcategory of public management policy¯under the interim government of Anand Punyarachun. This period is historically significant because it was one of the most important civil service reform efforts in the history of modern Thai administrative reform. Despite the short life of the government, civil service policy during this period underwent considerable change. The outcome of Anand’s civil service reform was a series of proposals related to civil service improvement¯the most important of which was an employment freeze. These proposals entailed changes in rules, routines, and the practice of human resources management in particular.

Public management policymaking in Spain, 1982-1996: Public management policymaking in Spain, 1982-1996:

Filesize: 253.01 kB

Raquel Gallego

This article deals with the topic of stability and change in public management policy. Over the last two decades, substantial change has occurred in public management policy in many countries, leading to the emergence of similarities and differences in public management policy outcomes. The article aims to contribute to the comparative analysis of public management policy change by studying the case of Spain, where no comprehensive public management policy change occurred. Its task is to explain why few changes took place in public management policy in Spain’s central government between 1982 and 1996, when several factors—such as active policy entrepreneurs in central agencies¯could have led to a different outcome. By using historical evidence within a policymaking process analytical framework, the Spain case may help identify the factors that affect administrative reform, not only in the Iberian family of nations, but also in a European context.

Public management policy change in the United States during the Clinton era Public management policy change in the United States during the Clinton era

Filesize: 246.95 kB

Donald P. Moynihan

U.S. public management policy changes follow a similar pattern. Despite strong ideas and active proponents, change is essentially incremental. This pattern continued under the presidency of Bill Clinton, 1993-2000. Clinton and Vice President Al Gore increased the level of attention to public management policy. They created the National Performance Review, a task force that identified problems with the management of the federal government and recommended a series of policy solutions. The National Performance Review changed a number of policies via executive mandate, but had limited success in convincing Congress to support its goals. Part of this failure was the result of the status and limited power of the National Performance Review itself. To a large degree, however, the institutional design of the U.S. system of government is not amenable to rapid or dramatic policy change, particularly when different parties control the branches of power. This article asks if active, high-level political entrepreneurship can overcome the barriers to change, focusing on Gore as an example. Evidence suggests that while Gore’s involvement was helpful in some respects, he failed to overcome, and may have reinforced, legislative barriers. However, success in the area of procurement policy suggests the potential of low-level policy entrepreneurship.

Public management policy change in Mexico, 1982-2000 Public management policy change in Mexico, 1982-2000

Filesize: 142.73 kB

Guillermo M. Cejudo

This article explains change in public management policy in the Mexican federal public administration during the 1980s and 1990s. It aims at explaining the sources and limits of change in public management policy in Mexico and, at the theoretical level, to provide insights about what accounts for change in public management policies. It contrasts two policy cycles¯moral renovation and administrative modernization¯that took place under the presidencies of Miguel De la Madrid (1982-1988) and Ernesto Zedillo (1994-2000).

Public management policy change in Brazil: 1995-1998 Public management policy change in Brazil: 1995-1998

Filesize: 233.59 kB

Francisco Gaetani

This article focuses on public management policy change in Brazil during the first term of President Fernando Henrique Cardoso. It explains the process of policy change, and is centered on the main events of the period 1995-1998. The events refer to actions and activities relevant to the policy cycle. Analytical categories of the multiple streams theoretical framework are used to dissect the policy change process. The selected events belong to the three streams of Kingdon’s model: politics, problems and policy. The narrative gravitates around the issue career within the processes of agenda setting, alternative specification, and decision making. Special attention is focused on the role played by a policy entrepreneur: Minister of Administration and State Reform Luiz Carlos Bresser Pereira. Institutional and noninstitutional factors help us understand and explain the episode. Topics such as the relationship between the executive and the legislature, organizations’ mandates, constitutional provisions, and governmental dynamics are identified and linked to the central subject of the episode. Topics such as economic shock, political dynamics, and personal idiosyncrasies are explored when they play a relevant role. The episode is narrated so as to allow comparisons with other cases.

Introduction: the process dynamics of public management policymaking Introduction: the process dynamics of public management policymaking

Filesize: 263.49 kB

Michael Barzelay

Public management policy is a novel classification in the academic study of public administration and management. Introduced in The New Public Management: Improving Research and Policy Dialogue (Barzelay 2001), the term refers to government-wide institutional rules and organizational routines related to expenditure planning and financial management, civil service and labor relations, procurement, organization and methods, and audit and evaluation. So defined, public management policy draws its meaning from a matrix of ideas, institutional relationships, and patterns of action that are highly familiar to public administration scholars and public officials alike. Seen from the center of government, public management policies are techniques for governing the organizations comprising the core public sector; equally, they are seen as tools for pursuing such policy aims as making governmental bureaucracies more efficient, transparent, smaller, responsive, or innovative. Seen from the perspective of program managers, public management policies are the rules of the game for acquiring and utilizing financial, human, material, and informational resources; often, public management policies are viewed by program managers as sources of perverse incentives or unnecessary constraints that diminish the efficiency and effectiveness of program operations (Chase and Reveal 1983; Wilson 1989; Barzelay 1992).