International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 7, No. 2

EMERGING TRENDS IN DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT: TENSION AND COMPLEXITY IN THE CONTINUING SEARCH FOR
     SOLUTIONS
GOOD GOVERNANCE, CLIENTELISM, AND PATRIMONIALISM: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON OLD PROBLEMS
IS EMPOWERMENT POSSIBLE UNDER A NEW PUBLIC MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENT? SOME LESSONS FROM INDIA
MANAGING DEVELOPMENT: NGO PERSPECTIVES?
PERFORMANCE-BASED FOREIGN ASSISTANCE THROUGH THE MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE ACCOUNT: SUSTAINED ECONOMIC
     GROWTH AS THE OBJECTIVE QUALIFYING CRITERION
PREFACE TO THE SPECIAL ISSUE ON EMERGING PERSPECTIVES ON DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT
REVIEW ESSAY: RE-FORMING THE STATE: GOVERNANCE INSTITUTIONS AND THE CREDIBILITY OF ECONOMIC POLICY
THE MISSING LINK: CREATING MUTUAL DEPENDENCIES BETWEEN THE POOR AND THE STATE

Documents

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THE MISSING LINK: CREATING MUTUAL DEPENDENCIES BETWEEN THE POOR AND THE STATE THE MISSING LINK: CREATING MUTUAL DEPENDENCIES BETWEEN THE POOR AND THE STATE

Filesize: 242.59 kB

JERRY MARK SILVERMAN

The absolute number of people living in poverty has increased since Robert McNamara established assistance to the poorest of the poor as the central development objective of the World Bank in 1973. If that trend is to be reversed, a new demand- driven/supply-responsive approach to poverty reduction is required. That new approach must include: (i) an expanded view of poverty that includes both objective and subjective elements, (ii) recognition that the poor have diverse interests among themselves, (iii) governments that are responsive to poor consumers’ demand, (iv) effective intermediation between formal and nonformal governance systems, and (v) restructuring of formal-sector government incentives to support the other required elements of the new approach. Implications for governments and donors are specified.

REVIEW ESSAY: RE-FORMING THE STATE: GOVERNANCE INSTITUTIONS AND THE CREDIBILITY OF ECONOMIC POLICY REVIEW ESSAY: RE-FORMING THE STATE: GOVERNANCE INSTITUTIONS AND THE CREDIBILITY OF ECONOMIC POLICY

Filesize: 216.69 kB

CARLOS SANTISO

Abstract Presidents, Parliaments, and Policy. Stephan Haggard and Mathew D. McCubbins, eds.; Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 2001, xvi+360 pages, references, index ($70 hardcover, ISBN 0-52177-304-0; $25 paperback, ISBN 0-52177-485-3)

Economic Policy Reform: The Second Stage. Anne O. Krueger, ed.; Chicago and London, The University of Chicago Press, 2000, xiv+614 pages, author and subject indexes ($65 hardcover, ISBN 022645-447-9)

Reinventing Leviathan: The Politics of Administrative Reform in Developing Countries. Ben Ross Schneider and Blanca Heredia, eds.; Miami, North-South Center Press at the University of Miami, 2003, 264 pages ($55 hardcover, ISBN 1-57454-101-3; $22.50 paperback, ISBN 1-57454-102-1)

Reinventing the State: Economic Strategy and Institutional Change in Peru. By Carol Wise; Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2003, 272 pages ($54.50 hardcover, ISBN 047211316X)

Sustainable Public Sector Finance in Latin America. Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Georgia, ed.; Atlanta, Research Department, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, 2000, ix+175 pages (paperback, ISBN 0-9624159-2-8).

PERFORMANCE-BASED FOREIGN ASSISTANCE THROUGH THE MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE ACCOUNT: SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GR PERFORMANCE-BASED FOREIGN ASSISTANCE THROUGH THE MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE ACCOUNT: SUSTAINED ECONOMIC GR

Filesize: 342.04 kB

SHEHERAZADE JAFARI, INDER K. SUD

The Millennium Challenge Account (MCA) is the Bush administration’s initiative to target foreign assistance to countries that have shown progress in the key areas of economic policy, social development, and governance. While this performance-based allocation of aid is a welcome step, the indicators currently proposed to measure progress are derived from generally subjective judgments and carry considerable margins of error. Using a country’s past record of economic growth as the key qualifying criterion for the MCA is a more reliable measure of performance. This article proposes how such a system of measurement can be utilized by the MCA.

MANAGING DEVELOPMENT: NGO PERSPECTIVES? MANAGING DEVELOPMENT: NGO PERSPECTIVES?

Filesize: 171.58 kB

SUSAN H. HOLCOMBE, SAFIA ALI NAWAZ, ANDERSON KAMWENDO, KHADY BA

We welcomed the term ‘development management’ to our professional lexicon several decades ago in part because of its focus on implementation and on achieving the objectives and values of the development enterprise. Over the years we have struggled with meaning, and how management is somehow different because it is about or for development. We still struggle with issues of power that are inherent in questions of who manages development, how, and for whom. Korten, in 1980, talked about participation and community control. In 2004, we still struggle with the limitations of top-down approaches and with how to achieve participation. This article is built on three mini-case studies prepared by masters degree students in the Sustainable International Development Program at Brandeis University. The cases use the conceptual lenses of ownership, partnership, and capacity building to examine the work of NGOs in Senegal, Malawi and Pakistan and to explore participation and power issues among their key stakeholders. It draws out lessons on managing power differentials, building trust, ownership and capacity, sharing accountability for outcomes, and building partnerships with local governments.

IS EMPOWERMENT POSSIBLE UNDER A NEW PUBLIC MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENT? SOME LESSONS FROM INDIA IS EMPOWERMENT POSSIBLE UNDER A NEW PUBLIC MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENT? SOME LESSONS FROM INDIA

Filesize: 248.73 kB

PATRICK KILBY

The article examines whether results-based management approaches to development program management are appropriate to the strategic shift to a governance agenda to promote broader citizen participation and its emphasis on increased empowerment. Empowerment is about people having expanded choices and a much greater level of involvement and control in all parts of their family and community lives. This is recognized as important in development policy areas such as good governance, promoting civil society, and decentralization. Using field research from fifteen NGOs working with poor women in India, the author shows that downward accountability and time are significant factors in empowerment. Results- based management approaches that have entered the field of project management over the past decade have the paradoxical effect of disempowering those it is meant to empower.

GOOD GOVERNANCE, CLIENTELISM, AND PATRIMONIALISM: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON OLD PROBLEMS GOOD GOVERNANCE, CLIENTELISM, AND PATRIMONIALISM: NEW PERSPECTIVES ON OLD PROBLEMS

Filesize: 219.65 kB

DERICK W. BRINKERHOFF, ARTHUR A. GOLDSMITH

This article examines why patron-client systems of governance persist around the world despite efforts to fight them through economic liberalization, democratization, decentralization, and civil service reform. Aid donors want developing countries to abandon clientelism to encourage production of public goods. However, our reexamination of the case literature finds that clientelism may have hidden positive externalities, such as the appeasement of elites and the integration of people into the state, which can make it attractive. There also is a collective action problem: individuals might prefer an alternative to clientelism, but they support the status quo as a safety-first strategy. We propose an analytic framework for diagnosing patron-client systems and suggest programming options for donors. Despite the obstacles, governance institutions have been improved selectively around the world, as a result of emerging political parties competing based on generalized appeals to interest, through the activities of policy entrepreneurs, or through advocacy by civil society organizations.

EMERGING TRENDS IN DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT: TENSION AND COMPLEXITY IN THE CONTINUING SEARCH FOR SOLUT EMERGING TRENDS IN DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT: TENSION AND COMPLEXITY IN THE CONTINUING SEARCH FOR SOLUT

Filesize: 156.59 kB

JENNIFER M. BRINKERHOFF

This article presents the collective findings and implications of the International Public Management Journal symposium on emerging trends in development management. Each of the five articles emphasizes a particular type of change in international development: changing definitions of development; new tools, processes, and actors; new agendas; and new donor assistance modalities. In doing so, they address the values, process, tools, and institutional agenda dimensions of development management. The five articles are introduced and collectively analyzed. This overview article introduces the symposium papers, highlights what they contribute to our understanding of the four dimensions of development management and their inherent tensions, and discusses their findings with respect to definitions of development and the consequent role the development industry might play. The article concludes with some thoughts on new and continuing challenges and opportunities.