International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 7, No. 3

ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE IN THE ASIA PACIFIC: APPLYING THE POLITICAL NEXUS TRIAD
ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM IN BANGLADESH: THREE DECADES OF FAILURE
ADMINISTRATIVE STYLES AND REGULATORY REFORM: INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON
     ADMINISTRATIVE BEHAVIOR
ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR REFORM OF U.S. AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL
BOOK REVIEW: FOR THE PEOPLE: CAN WE FIX PUBLIC SERVICE? BY John D. Donahue and Joseph S. Nye, Jr., eds.
BOOK REVIEW: GOVERNING AS GOVERNANCE by Jan Kooiman
BOOK REVIEW: THE EXECUTIVE AGENCY REVOLUTION IN WHITEHALL: PUBLIC INTEREST VERSUS BUREAU-SHAPING
     PERSPECTIVES by Oliver James
PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE: ADAPTING THE BALANCED SCORECARD IN LARVIK
     MUNICIPALITY
POLITICAL LIFE AND INTERVENTION LOGIC: RELEARNING OLD LESSONS?
RISK COMMUNICATION AND MANAGEMENT IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

Documents

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RISK COMMUNICATION AND MANAGEMENT IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY RISK COMMUNICATION AND MANAGEMENT IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

Filesize: 133.02 kB

RAGNAR E. LÖFSTEDT

Risk management and risk communication in Europe have undergone profound changes over the past twenty years or so. This article briefly outlines the changes that have occurred over time and discusses some of the resulting teething problems that have taken place and which now need to be addressed.

POLITICAL LIFE AND INTERVENTION LOGIC: RELEARNING OLD LESSONS? POLITICAL LIFE AND INTERVENTION LOGIC: RELEARNING OLD LESSONS?

Filesize: 181.68 kB

ROBERT GREGORY

Intervention logic (IVL) is an analytical technique being developed and used in New Zealand and elsewhere in an attempt to improve government’s ability to produce desired policy outcomes. This article raises questions about the political viability of this latest tool of mainstream policy analysis, and argues that improved public policymaking depends less on the use of techniques drawn from a long linear- rational tradition, which are taught because they can be taught, and more on the development of individual capacities and institutional processes that are in keeping with democratic norms and values.

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE: ADAPTING THE BALANCED SCORECARD IN LARVIK MU PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL INTELLIGENCE: ADAPTING THE BALANCED SCORECARD IN LARVIK MU

Filesize: 192.08 kB

JOSTEIN ASKIM

This article presents a study of how a balanced scorecard was implemented over a period of five years in four very different functional departments within Larvik municipality in Norway. The article narrates and compares the adaptation processes of the four departments, focusing on changes in their management control practices and changes in learning behavior. A surprising finding is that while management control practices of the departments varied, their learning behavior was similar. The study shows that governmental organizations from a wide range of areas of service delivery can become more active learners from adapting a performance management reform like the balanced scorecard. The article provides theoretically founded explanations of both differences and similarities in the departments’ adaptation processes, and theory of organizational learning is used to inform identification of factors that can lead governmental entities into a more active learning mode.

ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR REFORM OF ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR REFORM OF

Filesize: 249.41 kB

IRA LEWIS

A considerable amount of New Public Management-oriented research investigates alternative institutional arrangements for provision of services to the public. Some of this work argues in support of service delivery through an increase in outsourcing or by privatization of existing government functions. Air traffic control is provided to aircraft operators using airports and airspace all over the world. This article studies institutional arrangements of provision of air traffic control employing a comparative analysis of six nations: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The objective of the study is to determine whether a modification of the governance of the U.S. air traffic control system is appropriate and, if so, what alternatives seem most appropriate to replace the current system. Conclusions based upon the analysis suggest that air traffic control is most effectively provided on a not-for-profit basis, with indirect participation by stakeholders including airlines and airport operators in the governance of the air traffic control provider. For reasons related to safety, national security, and international obligations, governments remain ultimately responsible for providing this essential service. However, a strong argument may be made that the U.S. system should be reformed.

ADMINISTRATIVE STYLES AND REGULATORY REFORM: INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON ADMINIS ADMINISTRATIVE STYLES AND REGULATORY REFORM: INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON ADMINIS

Filesize: 200.58 kB

MICHAEL HOWLETT

The institutional structure of an organization creates a distinct pattern of constraints and incentives for state and societal actors which define and structure actors’ interests and channel their behavior. The interaction of these actors generates a particular administrative logic and process, or culture. However, since institutional structures vary, a neo-institutional perspective suggests that (1) there will be many different kinds of relatively long-lasting patterns of administrative behavior, each pattern being defined by the particular set of formal and informal institutions, rules, norms, traditions, and values of which it is comprised and (2) many different factors will affect the construction and deconstruction of each pattern. Following this logic, this article develops a multi-level, nested model of administrative styles and applies it to observed patterns of regulatory reform in many jurisdictions over the past several decades.

ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM IN BANGLADESH: THREE DECADES OF FAILURE ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM IN BANGLADESH: THREE DECADES OF FAILURE

Filesize: 120.71 kB

ABU ELIAS SARKER

All countries strive to reform their administrative systems in response to the challenges posed by socioeconomic, political, and technological environments. Bangladesh is no exception. Since its emergence as a nation-state, Bangladesh has been trying hard to reshape its administrative system. However, despite their perceived importance, administrative reforms in Bangladesh have encountered serious hurdles over the last thirty years. This article argues that lack of political commitment, the incapacity of the state, the clientelist nature of Bangladesh politics, bureaucratic resistance, factional strife in the public service, lack of fundamentals in administration, politicization, and corruption remain as serious stumbling blocks in the implementation of administrative reform programs.

ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE IN THE ASIA PACIFIC: APPLYING THE POLITICAL NEXUS TRIAD ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGE IN THE ASIA PACIFIC: APPLYING THE POLITICAL NEXUS TRIAD

Filesize: 173.6 kB

RICHARD COMMON

In their 1998 Governance article, Moon and Ingraham offered the political nexus triad (PNT) as a framework for the comparative analysis of public administration reform in Asia. Moon and Ingraham posited a strong relationship between the balance of the PNT (the relationship between politicians, bureaucracy, and civil society) and the scope and nature of administrative reform. Their analysis of China, Japan and South Korea yielded some interesting results in terms of the changing power relationships in those three countries as a result of administrative reforms. This article utilizes Moon and Ingraham’s comparative framework to investigate administrative change in three more Asian governments: Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Singapore. However, the key difference with Moon and Ingraham’s study is that in these three cases, it appeared that administrative reform was mainly used as an instrument to sustain existing PNTs in the face of political pressures, both internal and external. The article also exposes a weakness in Moon and Ingraham’s framework: that civil society provides a source of politicization that drives administrative change. Asian administrative traditions have yet to evolve to the extent that inputs from a wider civil society are sufficiently institutionalized to make an impact on the reform process.