International Public Management Network (IPMN)

Vol. 8, No. 1

BOOK REVIEW: PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE: STRATEGIC PLANNING IN THE U.S. AIR FORCE by Michael Barzelay and Colin
     Campbell
BOOK REVIEW: REINVENTING LEVIATHAN: THE POLITICS OF ADMINISTRATIVE REFORM IN DEVELOPING
     COUNTRIES by Ben Ross Schneider and Blanca Heredia
LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
MAPPING THE FIELD OF QUASI-AUTONOMOUS ORGANIZATIONS IN FRANCE AND ITALY
OBEDIENT SERVANTS? MANAGEMENT FREEDOMS AND ACCOUNTABILITIES IN THE NEW ZEALAND PUBLIC SECTOR by Richard
     Norman
PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION FOR THE MANAGERIAL AND THE POST-MANAGERIAL ERA: PROMISES AND REALITIES IN A
     GLOBALIZING PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION
REVIEW ESSAY: THE UNITED NATIONS AS A MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATION
SHOULD MANAGERS WALK AROUND OR WALK AWAY? PERCEPTIONS ABOUT AND EXPECTATIONS TOWARDS MANAGEMENT IN
     PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS
THE CITY OF LEIPZIG AS A EUROPEAN SUCCESS STORY IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
THE CONTENDING PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC MANAGEMENT: A PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATION

Documents

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THE CONTENDING PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC MANAGEMENT: A PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATION THE CONTENDING PERSPECTIVES ON PUBLIC MANAGEMENT: A PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATION

Filesize: 117.3 kB

JOHN DIXON, RHYS DOGAN

This article draws upon the philosophy of the social sciences to develop a framework that permits a critical analysis of public management. It uses this framework to construct a taxonomy that enables the identification of the competing philosophical paradigms that underpin contending perspectives on what constitutes good public management, so enabling the articulation of their salient risks and thus their fundamental flaws. It finally proposes the philosophical requirements for a coherent approach to public management reform.

THE CITY OF LEIPZIG AS A EUROPEAN SUCCESS STORY IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THE CITY OF LEIPZIG AS A EUROPEAN SUCCESS STORY IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Filesize: 195.2 kB

JEAN-CLAUDE GARCIA-ZAMOR

The article defines the role for public administration in a society still in transition. It describes how civil servants in the city of Leipzig cope with the challenges stemming from the uneven economic conditions that continue to exist between the Länder even after the reunification of Germany. It also reviews a series of recent successes achieved by the managerial leaders of Leipzig. The city of Leipzig, and in particular its mayor, has been successful in boosting economic competitiveness. The article also investigates the local civic culture. It develops a concept of local political culture and defines its key elements. In addition to looking at the professional strength of the city civil servants, the article also analyzes the new organizational theories and models being used by the mayor and the city managers of Leipzig to achieve these successes and discusses the so-called Leipzig model.

SHOULD MANAGERS WALK AROUND OR WALK AWAY? PERCEPTIONS ABOUT AND EXPECTATIONS TOWARDS MANAGEMENT IN P SHOULD MANAGERS WALK AROUND OR WALK AWAY? PERCEPTIONS ABOUT AND EXPECTATIONS TOWARDS MANAGEMENT IN P

Filesize: 421.41 kB

HELGE HERNES

This article reports the findings from an empirical study at Norwegian schools and hospitals aimed at examining professional employees’ perceptions about and expectations towards their managers. A framework based on four organization theory approaches was used: the professional and street-level bureaucracy approach, the management-leadership approach, the relationship between employers and employees, and the ideas of organizations as loosely coupled or decoupled systems. The results indicate that professional employees want their managers to motivate and encourage them and to give them feedback, rather than wanting autonomy and perceiving the managers to have other interests than they do. Thus, rather than wanting their managers to walk away, they want them to walk around. The challenge of being a manager in such organizations is not that of autonomy ideals among the employees or the handling of opposing interests; rather, it is because the demand for leadership exceeds what the managers are able to supply.

PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION FOR THE MANAGERIAL AND THE POST-MANAGERIAL ERA: PROMISES AND REALITIES IN A PUBLIC SECTOR INNOVATION FOR THE MANAGERIAL AND THE POST-MANAGERIAL ERA: PROMISES AND REALITIES IN A

Filesize: 281.37 kB

ERAN VIGODA-GADOT, AVIV SHOHAM, NITZA SCHWABSKY, AYALLA RUVIO

This article1 deals with the fuzzy concept of organizational innovation in public sector domains. While it is not the first attempt to bring organizational innovation into the realm of public administration, the article provides a broader understanding of innovation in modern bureaucracies and points to some empirical efforts that may accelerate post-public managerial reforms. This understanding builds on a system approach and on existing knowledge about innovation its characteristics, antecedents, and consequences as they have been previously encountered in the private business arena. We suggest that this knowledge should be treated as another key element of New Public Management (NPM) doctrine and the reinventing government paradigm that have dominated discussions in this discipline in recent years. The article presents a clearer perception of the innovation process, its unique meaning for modern bureaucracies, and its potential evolution into reform-seeking governance. We conclude that innovative bureaucracy is not necessarily a self-defeating concept. Bridging the gap between the promise and the realities of innovation has never been an easy task. Turning ideals into realities is still a major challenge facing public administration reform, now and for the foreseeable future.

MAPPING THE FIELD OF QUASI-AUTONOMOUS ORGANIZATIONS IN FRANCE AND ITALY MAPPING THE FIELD OF QUASI-AUTONOMOUS ORGANIZATIONS IN FRANCE AND ITALY

Filesize: 247.74 kB

MARINE ALLIX, SANDRA VAN THIEL

The quango continuum designed by Greve, Flinders, and Van Thiel aimed to help in identifying and categorizing different quasi-autonomous organizations in the UK, Denmark, and the Netherlands. Here, the continuum is applied to France and Italy in order to test its validity as a tool to study the field of quangos and to introduce French and Italian quasi-autonomous organizations. The continuum turns out to be a relevant framework to show the specific features of these organizations in different countries. On the whole, France seems to favor more public bodies than Italy, which is more inclined to turn them into private entities.